The City in Siberia – Novosibirsk, Russia Photos

It's 9*C in early September.

During the 2nd World War, Germany invaded European Russia.

To avoid losing the entire Russian manufacturing industry, Stalin packaged every factory in Euro-Russia.

Stalin then shipped the factories to this city to be rebuilt, in order to produce an endless supply of tanks, planes, and weapons.

Welcome to New Siberia

P.S. Since the end of the USSR, Novosibirsk has undergone a rapid gentrification. Pretty much new malls, apartments, restaurants, and everything else.

Novosibirsk is a modern city, without a doubt, with it's Soviet Era style still intact.

 

A Video Review of Novosibrisk, Russia

Full Novosibirsk, Russia Gallery

Leonidas in Novosibirsk, Russia

Chapel of St. Nicholas cuts through the main road of Krasnny Prospekt (Red Avenue) in Novosibirsk, Russia

Facing a building built in 1921 after soviet occupation, with a Rosgostrah Bank advertising on it, in Novosibirsk, Russia

Plochad Lenin (Lenin Square), with a statue dedicated to WW2 in Novosibirsk, Russia

A statue in Plochad Lenin dedicated to the workers of the soviet union in Novosibirsk, Russia

A girl walks through the underground markets in Novosibirsk, Russia

Hedgehogs are a popular animal in Russian culture

St. Nicholas Chapel in Novosibirsk, Russia

An interesting building featuring the ‘Gastronimic Theatre' in Novosibirsk, Russia

An old pre-soviet building overshadowed by a beautifully blue coloured building in Novosibirsk, Russia

Overlooking the Alexander Nevsky Chapel in Novosibirsk, Russia, built in 1899 by the order of Emperor Alexander.

A cross atop the Alexander Nevsky Chapel in Novosibirsk, Russia

The orange structure of the Alexander Nevsky Cathedral in Novosibirsk Russia contrasts against the blue sky

Inside the Alexander Nevsky Cathedral in Novosibirsk, Russia

A man prays inside the Alexander Nevsky Cathedral in Novosibirsk, Russia

The various priests throughout the years in the Alexander Nevsky Cathedral in Novosibirsk, Russia.

The fancy chandelier in the Alexander Nevsky Cathedral in Novosibirsk, Russia.

The various priests over the years in the Russian Christian Religion

A priest gives a sermon in the Alexander Nevsky Cathedral in Novosibirsk, Russia.

A statue of a bull overlooks a motorbike outside a restaurant in Novosibirsk

An old soviet railroad over the river Ob in Novosibirsk

The security outpost used to prevent risks during the soviet era on the river Ob

The river Ob in September in Novosibirsk

Novosibirsk is rapidly growing thanks to foreign and domestic investments into property

A common tradition, to affirm your relationship with a lock on a bridge, Novosibirsk in this case

A statue of Emperor/Tsar Alexander the 3rd in Novosibirsk, Russia

2 men gaze at their construction equipment next to the river Ob in Novosibirsk

A common trend is to have a boat-restaurant on rivers

People inside the Novosibirsk metro station

Cathedral of Ascension (Voznesensky Sobor) in Novosibirsk

A Soviet-era grey apartment block on the left, and a 21st century apartment on the right in Novosibirsk

The main train station to travel around Russia. You can go as far as you wish from Novosibirsk

Pigeons bask in the warm sun, amidst the rapidly dropping temperature in Novosibirsk, in front of the train station

A girl poses in front of the Train station in Novosibirsk. This is typical September clothing in Russia

The various destinations across Russia, available on the board in the main train station in Novosibirsk

The main office building for the Train administration in Novosibirsk

AeroFlot office building in Novosibirsk. Aeroflot is one of the oldest flight agencies in Russia, since the soviet era. Still has the hammer and sickle.

The view of the city from the rooftops of Novosibirsk. A mix of old and new architecture. Overlooking Krasny Prospekt (Red Avenue)

Nuclear and coal energy power the city of Novosibirsk. The close proximity is startling

The soviet-block configuration of Novosibirsk is incredible!

A closeup of Krasny Prospekt (Red Avenue) in Novosibirsk

Rays of sun poke through the clouds onto the south eastern part of Novosibirsk

Giant Lego-block like structures permeate no more than 10-15 floors above the ground in Novosibirsk. Architecture advancements in Russia were creatively very suppressed.

Probably the old offices of Aeroflot, one of the oldest flight agencies in Russia

The buildings in this case look like L-shaped Tetris blocks, in Novosibirsk

A new blue-coloured apartment shoots through the sky in Novosibirsks central core

Renovations in Novosibirsk are underway for the last 25+ years after the fall of the Soviet union.

Almost every apartment complex in the ex-soviet union states has a playground, to spur the growth of families

Focusing more on central Krasny Prospekt in Novosibirsk

There is an abundance of grey soviet-era blocks in Novosibirsk, Russia. These were simply, and fast to build, and served their purpose of housing families… nothing more.

A panoramic view of Novosibirsk, Russia

Facing northwards in Novosibirsk. There is a crazy mix of old and new architecture.

Looking at Ploshchad' Kondratyuka in Novosibirsk

The Cathedral of Ascension (Voznesensky Sobor) in Novosibirsk really contrasts with its surroundings

Leonidas taking a selfie on the rooftops in Novosibirsk

Despite a vast grid of grey apartment blocks, Novosibirsk still tries to beautify itself once in a while

 

Conclusion

Novosibirsk represents a typical soviet-style city, with a large number of ‘communist blocks' of apartments, for kilometers on end. The city is clean, safe, and very well organized.

I would recommend visiting here for a day or 2 maximum, although there isn't much to see outside of buildings within the central cores.

1 Comment

  1. We, Went on the Trans Siberian Railway 1977 when the USSR was still a communist state. Stopped off in Novosibirsk for over two days. The hotel had a woman on each floor who sat at her desk near the stairs and controlled the room keys each time we went out and arrived back. Our lady would keep them locked up in her desk draw and was a little officious or maybe just bored, but there was no unemployment in Russia we were told. The room was clean and livable but I noticed the roof of the apartment block across the street had a few loose tiles in one place and I wondered what happened when it rained. There was a huge single red plastic tulip structure outside imbedded into the pavement.

    Went to the ballet one night. The performers were quite good with the occasional slip up but they were not the Bolshie Ballet Company. The venue was packed and at the end there were so many bunches of flowers present to the performer’s. I must confess that I did nod off a few times and was prodded by my girl friend when I did so.

    The food was acceptable, but I have to say that one day on our trip we were given cucumber as part of our meal at breakfast, dinner and tea. I had to laugh when, in a film, Yule Brinner played a Russian Officer who was having a meal with the captured tourists who happened to cross over the boarder accidently and which was regarded as an international incident. Yule asked an American tourist if he liked cucumber as he was slicing his own up. The American nervously replied that he did. Yule replied. “I hate them, but in Russia, you eat what you are offered.”

    The next day, we were walking around in a group and came across a shop that just sold cucumbers and one of our crew said that she loved cucumbers and went in to buy one. She came out with two very big bags of them. We all laughed and asked what had happened. She said, ” I gave her a rubble and she gave me these. What do I do with them?” I can’t remember what she did with them.

    We were in an open market one afternoon where people were selling odd items from tables. Home garden produce in small amounts were on sale and one person had about a dozen small apples for sale. A potential customer picked one up and held in both hands and twisted it into two halves, so he had to be very strong to do that or their is a knack to it. It had a worm or whatever in it and the brown track mark maggots leave behind. The customer looked at the purveyor and said something and then tossed the pieces into the air towards him and walked away. Shortly after there was a commotion of excitement, as people around communicated with each other, as they quickly moved to congregate into the traditional Russian shopping line for a sought out product. We investigated and realised that there were about ten or more cases of oranges that had arrived which were in big demand.

    We were taken to a Russian Orthodox Church , a beautiful place where the congregation were singing so beautifully, the priest had a very deep voice like Ivan Rubinoff. We felt as if we were intruding as it was obvious the congregation was not happy about being presented to the tourists as they were, but it was lovely singing and I am grateful for the experience.

    One evening we went down to the Ob River where except for a big stocky Russian was deserted. The sun was setting and the Russian guy strolled over and he had a unlit cigarette in his mouth and he obviously was making signs that he wanted a light. I pulled out a box of matches that were of Asian origin. He looked at them with much interest, struck one to light his cigarette and put the box in his pocket. He said something in a voice that did not make me comfortable about asking for them back, and he walked away. He was welcome to them.

    One night about half a dozen of us went to the hotel restaurant as we heard a live band performing. We did not know that it operated as a club in the evening. We went in and felt a little uncomfortable as it was obvious that we were tourists which sparked some interest from the clientele. We did not feel that welcome really. However, we bought some beers and sat at our table. The clientele were enjoying themselves just like we would in a club of our own, we began to feel more relaxed and had a few more beers although we did not get up to he dance floor. I have to say that Russian women are generally nice looking and some more so. We had other experiences and I am glad that we did stop over in Novosibirsk, but I sometimes think that the three weeks or more that we spent in the USSR was too long. One thing though, we went to Asia when it was not as westernised as it is these days and I believe that it was probably more interesting then than now. As for the people, generally I think they just want a happy life like we do, but politics, bad rouge and dishonest people, and increasing mad population growth in some countries, just keeps on messing things up.

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